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Baking Lessons for Beginners: 3 Things You Need to Know About ‘Mise En Place’

When it comes to baking, preparation is key.

Many times, we get all giddy to start a recipe without proper preparation. But truth be told, baking is a science as it is an art. So, what is the one of the most important baking lessons one can put to heart? The concept of “mise en place”, of course. To the unacquainted, it’s a French phrase, which when translated in English means “everything in place”. Here are some important prepwork you should do before starting with step one of any recipe.

1.) Review and understand the procedures from start to finish.

Before starting your baking session, read the recipes thoroughly. Likewise, make sure to identify some terminologies and techniques you may not be familiar with. For instance, when a recipe like Thumbprint Cookies requires you to beat until “creamy”, how can you determine what kind of creamy consistency? Or perhaps a Taisan recipe requires you to beat egg whites until forming “firm, stiff” peaks, how would you identify this? As with anything, the internet is your BFF. You can also opt to join us in our virtual baking classes to get a clearer picture of what it all means.

2.) Clean your stations.

Image: Pexels

At this point, we’re sure you’re pretty excited to lay the groundwork for your baked goods masterpiece. But before you do just that, don’t forget to start with a clean kitchen and an empty sink. Clearing out your baking space is just as important too. 

3.) Have all your ingredients measured and arrange them accordingly.

Having all your ingredients pre-measured, with all the tools you need in place, is a great way to keep you on track of where you are in the process. It saves you time by lessening the unnecessary interruptions of having to measure your cream of tartar midway when you’re already in the zone. It also saves you from baking errors, like placing a different ingredient or doubling on an ingredient, among others. For instance if you’re making Mamon or Chocolate Chip Muffins with the kids, grouping your ingredients together will let you know if you’ve already put in the sugar (when at times, it looks like your salt). 

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